The film by Guy Ritchie, “The Man from U.N.C.L.E." was partly filmed in Italy, in the Gulfs of Naples and Pozzuoli. Tagged Warner Bros, and co-starring – among othersMan from UNCLE - Rome -  Hugh Grant and last Superman hero Henry Cavill, here a CIA agent fighting evil in the Tyrrhenian Sea, the film is a remake of an American cult TV series of the sixties. It tells how, during the Cold War, two spies - one from the West and one from the East - decide to form a team  to track down and destroy a German scientist, who’s trying to create a new atomic bomb from his refuge in the Aragonese Castle of Baia, the great fortress of Roman origins, rising on a rock spur dominating the sea of Pozzuoli, in the very place where, according to the main historical and literary sources, the villa of the Roman dictator Julius Caesar rose up.

In conversation with Cesare Casella, a chef on the Upper West Side who welcomes lovers of Italian cuisine and prepares typical dishes following a few simple rules: simplicity, authenticity and respect for the territory.  But, above all, a love for his homeland

First created in 1943, a “Vespa” is not simply a scooter but has become, over time, one of the most powerful symbols of “Italian lifestyle”. It followed the evolution of society in post-war Italy, becoming increasingly popular during the years of the Economic Boom and the “Dolce Vita”, until it came to represent a style that encompasses some of the fundamental elements of the “Italian Way”: life in the open air, energy, lightness, close contact with the beauty around us.

My Sicily is a metaphor…Just like the title of the interview- book I wrote in 1979 with the author Leonardo Sciascia for Stock publications, which was translated into Italian by Mondadori. I discovered Sicily in 1975.  I had a meeting with Sciascia who has just agreed to become an “independent” candidate on the Communist party’s list for the municipal elections in Palermo.  The news had caused great excitement in the editorial offices of the Nouvel Observateur: how could a critical, even sceptical writer suddenly throw himself into politics? And in Sicily, no less?

An interview with Sante De Sanctis, the Roman chef who lives and works in Stuttgart, extolling the virtues of Italian cuisine in his restaurant as well as by writing books and making television appearances. His stories, as well as his dishes, demonstrate his great love of Rome and, in particular, one of the city’s most characteristic districts, Testaccio. He reveals exclusively to “Emotions in Italy” the most thrilling moment of his life: the day maestro Pavarotti came into his kitchen and starting to sing with him …Sante de Sanctis

Italian Cuisine, the best ambassador