Anyone who undertakes a tour of Italy is constantly offered the opportunity to admire the monuments and architectures of the past in the thousands of places that preserve the art and history of the Bel Paese. However the spectacle that greets visitors to Scorrano, a small village in Salento, Puglia, leaves them speechless.  Because here the architectures are made of light, yet they are just as impressive and majestic as the greatest monuments.

Every year, in July, thousands of people travel to Scorrano for the feast of Santa Domenica.

On June 7th the unique setting of Venice will provide the backdrop for one of the most spectacular events linked to the history of the Bel Paese: the Regatta of the Ancient Maritime Republics, the origins of which date back to Italy’s glorious maritime tradition during the Middle Ages.

Venice is a fascinating city, mainly because of the mysterious elements of its history, a history which remains mostly to be explored.

It is also possible to discover Venice by recovering its ancient vine varieties: this is what the project set up by the Consorzio Vini Venezia [Venice Wine Consortium] proposed to do in order to unearth the origins, provenance and characteristics of the ancient vines to be found on the Lagoon. The project will study their DNA, take samples and propagate them on order to create vineyards that will constitute a genetic bank of the varietals uncovered by the study.

While waiting for the sets to arrive for the remake of "Ben Hur" and the new 007 movie, scheduled to be filmed in Italy in February, the crew of the NBC TV series "Hannibal", starring Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen, considered by American critics to be the “best television horror of all time”, is coming to Florence. Starring alongside Mikkelsen is Gillian Anderson, who plays his psychoanalyst who has become his accomplice in a murder and is now hiding out with him under a false name in the birthplace of the Renaissance.

In the 1200’s, excited after seeing the birthplace of Jesus Christ, St. Francis of Assisi held a reenactment of the Christmas miracle in a cave outside of Greccio, Italy. With the Pope’s blessing, nativity scenes, both static and live, became a cherished part of the Italian – and worldwide – Christmas celebration. Presepe, or Presepi Viventi, are still set up and reenacted all throughout Italy.